mention.tech

Receiving webmentions for everyone

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Some of us have thought about doing it before, but perhaps just jumping into the water and trying it out may be the best way to begin designing, testing, and building a true online IndieWeb Book Club. Ruined By Design Earlier this week I saw a notice about an upcoming local event for Mike Monteiro‘s new book Ruined by Design: How Designers Destroyed the World, and What We Can Do to Fix It (Mule Books, March 2019, ISBN: 978-1090532084). Given the IndieWeb’s focus on design which is built into several of their principles, I thought this looked like a good choice for kicking off such an IndieWeb Book Club. Here’s the description of the book from the publisher: The world is working exactly as designed. The combustion engine which is destroying our planet’s atmosphere and rapidly making it inhospitable is working exactly as we designed it. Guns, which lead to so much death, work exactly as they’re designed to work. And every time we “improve” their design, they get better at killing. Facebook’s privacy settings, which have outed gay teens to their conservative parents, are working exactly as designed. Their “real names” initiative, which makes it easier for stalkers to re-find their victims, is working exactly as designed. Twitter’s toxicity and lack of civil discourse is working exactly as it’s designed to work.The world is working exactly as designed. And it’s not working very well. Which means we need to do a better job of designing it. Design is a craft with an amazing amount of power. The power to choose. The power to influence. As designers, we need to see ourselves as gatekeepers of what we are bringing into the world, and what we choose not to bring into the world. Design is a craft with responsibility. The responsibility to help create a better world for all. Design is also a craft with a lot of blood on its hands. Every cigarette ad is on us. Every gun is on us. Every ballot that a voter cannot understand is on us. Every time social network’s interface allows a stalker to find their victim, that’s on us. The monsters we unleash into the world will carry your name. This book will make you see that design is a political act. What we choose to design is a political act. Who we choose to work for is a political act. Who we choose to work with is a political act. And, most importantly, the people we’ve excluded from these decisions is the biggest (and stupidest) political act we’ve made as a society.If you’re a designer, this book might make you angry. It should make you angry. But it will also give you the tools you need to make better decisions. You will learn how to evaluate the potential benefits and harm of what you’re working on. You’ll learn how to present your concerns. You’ll learn the importance of building and working with diverse teams who can approach problems from multiple points-of-view. You’ll learn how to make a case using data and good storytelling. You’ll learn to say NO in a way that’ll make people listen. But mostly, this book will fill you with the confidence to do the job the way you always wanted to be able to do it. This book will help you understand your responsibilities. I suspect that this book will be of particular interest to those in the IndieWeb, A Domain of One’s Own, the EdTech space (and OER), and really just about anyone. How to participate I’m open to other potential guidelines and thoughts since this is incredibly experimental at best, but I thought I’d lay out the following broad ideas for how we can generally run the book club and everyone can keep track of the pieces online. Feel free to add your thoughts as responses to this post or add them to the IndieWeb wiki’s page indieweb.org/IndieWeb_Book_Club. Buy the book or get a copy from your local bookstore Read it along with the group Post your progress, thoughts, replies/comments, highlights, annotations, reactions, quotes, related bookmarks, podcast or microcast episodes, etc. about the book on your own website on your own domain. If your site doesn’t support any of these natively, just do your best and post simple notes that you can share. In the end, this is about the content and the discussion first and the technology second, but feel free to let it encourage you to improve your own site for doing these things along the way. Folks can also post on other websites and platforms if they must, but that sort of defeats some of the purpose of the Indie idea, right? Syndicate your thoughts to indieweb.xyz to the stub indieweb.xyz/en/bookclub/ as the primary location for keeping track of our conversation. Directions for doing this can be found at https://indieweb.xyz/howto/en. Optionally syndicate them to other services like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, etc. Optionally mention this original post, and my website will also aggregate the comments via webmention to the comment section below. At regular intervals, check in on the conversations linked on indieweb.xyz/en/bookclub/ and post your replies and reactions about them on your own site. If your site doesn’t support sending/receiving webmentions (a special type of open web notifications), take a look at Aaron Parecki’s post Sending your first Webmention and keep in mind that you can manually force webmentions with services like Telegraph or Mention-Tech.  I’ll also try to keep track of entries I’m aware about on my own site as read or bookmark posts which I’ll tag with #IWBCMM (ostensibly for IndieWeb Book Club Mike Monteiro), which we can also use on other social silos for keeping track of the conversation there. Perhaps as we move along, I’ll look into creating a planet for the club as well as aggregating OPML files of those who create custom feeds for their posts. If I do this it will only be to supplement the aggregation of posts at the stub on indieweb.xyz which should serve as the primary hub for the club’s conversation. If you haven’t run across it yet you can also use gRegor Morrill‘s IndieBookClub.biz tool in the process.  If you don’t already have your own website or domain to participate, feel free to join in on other portions of social media, but perhaps consider jumping into the IndieWeb chat to ask about how to get started to better own your online identity and content.  If you need help putting together your own site, there are many of us out here who can help get you started. I might also recommend using micro.blog which is an inexpensive and simple way to have your own website. I know that Manton Reece has already purchased a copy of the book himself. I hope that he and the rest of the micro.blog community will participate  along with us. If you feel technically challenged, please ping me about your content and participation, and I’m happy to help aggregate your posts to the indieweb.xyz hub on your behalf. Ideally a panoply of people participating on a variety of technical levels and platforms will help us create a better book club (and a better web) for the future. Of course, if you feel the itch to build pieces of infrastructure into your own website for improved participation, dive right in. Feel free to document what you’re doing both your own website and the IndieWeb wiki so others can take advantage of what you’ve come up with. Also feel free to join in on upcoming Homebrew Website Clubs (either local or virtual) or IndieWebCamps to continue brainstorming and iterating in those spaces as well. Kickoff and Timeline I’m syndicating this post to IndieNews for inclusion into next week’s IndieWeb newsletter which will serve as a kickoff notice. That will give folks time to acquire a copy of the book and start reading it. Of course this doesn’t mean that you couldn’t start today. Share and repost this article with anyone you think might enjoy participating in the meanwhile. I’ll start reading and take a stab at laying out a rough schedule. If you’re interested in participating, do let me know; we can try to mold the pace to those who actively want to participate. I’ve already acquired a copy of the book and look forward to reading it along with you. Syndicated copies to: Flipboard icon Plurk icon Tumblr icon WordPress Twitter icon
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I use Hypothes.is regularly as part of my daily workflow. I’m also very interested in being able to “own” the data I generate with the tool and being able to keep it on my own digital commonplace book (aka website). As part of this, I’d like to be able to receive notifications from people publicly annotating, highlighting, and replying to my content and potentially display those directly on either my website in the comments section or as marginalia. I’d promised to do a quick outline for the kind gang at Hypothes.is to outline how to make their product could be a bit more open and support some additional web standards to make it more IndieWeb friendly as well as to work toward supporting the Webmention protocol to send notifications of annotations on a page. A few weeks ago at IndieWebCamp New Haven I decided to finally sketch out some of the pieces which should be relatively easy for them to implement into the product. Below are some of the recommendations and some examples of what needs to be done to implement them into their platform to allow it to better interact with other content on the web. This post is in reply to a few prior conversations about Webmention, but primarily pertains to Microformats which will help in creating those. [1] [2] [3] [4] Overview To my knowledge Hypothes.is generates a hash for each annotation it has in the system and generates two separate, but related URLs for them. As an example, here are the two URLs for a response Jon Udell made on my website recently: hypothes.is/a/_tLJyA-cEemE-qPndyfQow hyp.is/_tLJyA-cEemE-qPndyfQow The first URL is where a stand-alone copy of the annotation lives on the web, separate from the content it is related to. The second URL resolves to the page on which the annotation was made and both will automatically open up Hypothesis’ side drawer UI to the annotation in question and will–on most browsers–auto-scroll down the page to show the point at which the annotation was made. Essentially this second URL shows the annotation in-situ in conjunction with the Hypothes.is user interface. I’ll note that they can also have some human readable trailing data in the URL that indicates the site on which the annotation was made like so: hyp.is/_tLJyA-cEemE-qPndyfQow/boffosocko.com/?p=55708991. However, in practice, one could remove or replace the boffosocko.com and trailing portion with any other URL and the correct page will still resolve. It is great that they make the first URL available with the relevant data. This in itself is very IndieWeb friendly to have each annotation in the system have its own stand-alone URL. Sadly all the data on this particular page seems to be rendered using JavaScript rather than being raw HTML. (See also js;dr.) This makes the page human readable, but makes it much more difficult for machines to read or parse these pages. I’d recommend three simple things to make Hypothes.is more (Indie)Web friendly: Render the annotation on the first URL example in full HTML instead of JavaScript; Add the appropriate microformats classes on those pages; Add the canonical URL for the page on which the annotation is in reference to either instead of or in addition to the Hypothes.is prefixed URL which already appears on these pages. Webmention functioning properly will require this canonical URL to exist on the page to be able to send notifications and have them be received properly. These things would make these pages more easily and usefully parseable on the open web. If/when Hypothes.is may support Webmention (aka web notifications) then all of these prerequisite pieces will already be in place. In the erstwhile, even without Hypothes.is running code to support sending Webmentions, users could force manual Webmentions using services like Telegraph, mention-tech.appspot, or even personal endpoints generated on individual posts (see the one below) or on custom endpoint pages like mine on WordPress. Aaron Parecki’s article Sending your First Webmention from Scratch is a useful tutorial for those with little experience with Microformats or Webmention. Types of Annotations and Microformats Markup To my knowledge there are three distinct types of annotations that might occur which may need slightly different microformats mark up depending on the type. These are: Unassigned page notes (or sometimes orphaned page notes): For all intents and purposes are the equivalent of bookmarks (and are used this way by many) though they go by a different name within the service. Highlights of particular passages: In IndieWeb parlance, these are roughly equivalent to quotations of content. Highlights and annotations of particular passages: In IndieWeb terms these again are quotes of content which also have what might be considered a reply or comment to that segment of quoted text. Alternately the annotation itself might be considered a note related to what was highlighted, but I suspect from a UI and semantic viewpoint, treating these as replies is probably more apropos in the majority of cases. Each of these can obviously have one or more potential tags as well. Some of the examples below include the p-category microformats for how these would logically appear. Using the example URL above and several others for the other cases, I’ll provide some example HTML with proper microformats classes to make doing the mark up easier. I’ve created some minimal versions of text and mark up, though Hypothes.is obviously includes much more HTML (and a variety of divs for CSS purposes. While some of the mark up is a bit wonky, particularly with respect to adding the hyp.is and the original posts’ canonical URLs, it could be somewhat better with some additional reworking of the presentation, but I wanted to change as little as possible of their present UI. For the minimal examples, I’ve stripped out the native Hypothes.is classes and only included the semantic microformats. Because microformats are only meant for semantic mark up, the developers should keep in mind it is good practice NOT to use these classes for CSS styling. Page note with no annotations (bookmarks) Example from hypothes.is/a/_tLJyA-cEemE-qPndyfQow (but without the annotation portion)
judell Public on <hyp.is/_tLJyA-cEemE-qPndyfQow/boffosocko.com/?p=55708991>"Chris Aldrich on the IndieWeb" (boffosocko.com)
tag-name1
tag-name2
tag-name3
Page note with an annotation (aka a reply, but could alternately be marked up as above as a bookmark) Example from hypothes.is/a/_tLJyA-cEemE-qPndyfQow
judell Public on <hyp.is/_tLJyA-cEemE-qPndyfQow/boffosocko.com/?p=55708991>"Chris Aldrich on the IndieWeb" (boffosocko.com)

This is web thinking in action.

blog.jonudell.net/2011/01/24/seven-ways-to-think-like-the-web/

Well done!

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Highlights (aka quotes) Example from hypothes.is/a/_tLJyA-cEemE-qPndyfQow
judell Public on "As We May Think" (www.theatlantic.com)
First he runs through an encyclopedia, finds an interesting but sketchy article, leaves it projected. Next, in a history, he finds another pertinent item, and ties the two together.
IAnnotate2017
Annotations (replies) Example from hypothes.is/a/9JrX5lf9RraeLKKn9WwmMQ
jeremydean Public on "As We May Think" (www.theatlantic.com)
This has not been a scientist's war; it has been a war in which all have had a part.

It kind of blows me mind that the end of WWII is the context for these early dreams of the Internet. Is it the hope experienced in patriotic collaboration toward technological innovation? That's what Bush seems to acknowledge explicitly. It's a techno-militaristic union that haunts us to this day (#prism). But I wonder too if it's the precarious of knowledge, or perhaps the destructiveness of knowledge, that also inspires Bush…

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I’ll also note that there’s the potential of a reply on Hypothes.is to a prior reply to a canonical URL source. In that case it could be either marked up as a reply to the “parent” on Hypothesis and/or a reply to the canonical source URL, or even both so that webmentions could be sent further upstream. (My experience in this is more limited, not having dealt with it personally in the past.) Once these pieces are implemented, they can be tested against a variety of microformats parsers to ensure they’re outputting the correct (and properly nested) information. I often find that pin13 is a pretty solid modern and up-to-date choice for this. Additional resources with examples microformats.org/wiki/h-entry microformats.org/wiki/h-card microformats.org/wiki/h-cite indieweb.org/bookmark indieweb.org/reply indieweb.org/quotation indieweb.org/reply-context I’ll also leave the caveat here, that while I’ve got a stronger grasp of Microformats than the average bear, that the above examples may have some subtle quirks that others may catch or which could be improved upon. I find that the Microformats web chat can be a good source for helps from some of the world’s best experts in the area. (Other methods for engaging in chat via IRC, Slack, etc. can be utilized as well.) If Dan, Jon, or any of the gang has questions about any of this, I’m happy to chat via phone, video conference, or other to help get them going. Syndicated copies to: WordPress Twitter icon
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Dank je voor de tips Ton. Je weet, webmentions zijn niet mijn sterkste kant en ik kan alle hulp gebruiken om ze goed over te zetten naar de nieuwe site. Inmiddels heb ik via de Indieweb Chat al meer tips gekregen waaronder de Send A Webmention service van Telegraph en Mention.tech om eveneens handmatig ze opnieuw te versturen. Aangezien het om een flink aantal webmentions gaat, vermoed ik dat een importer in WordPress met een PHP script toch de beste route is. Dat ik het dan weer voor een groot deel zelf moet bouwen….tja…dat is de Indieweb spirit nietwaar?
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Watched EDU 522: Daily Update VI: Sending A Manual Webmention from YouTube A short video on how to send a manual webmention to a WordPress site that's using the Webmention plugin. WordPress sites also have a separate visual endpoint that can be used manually. They’re typically found at example.com/wp-json/webmention/1.0/endpoint. Other manual methods for both WordPress-based and non-WordPress sites include: sendawebmention.com mention-tech.appspot.com/
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Listened to 2ToPonder Episode One by Greg McVerry from jgregorymcverry.com My first attempt at a microcast: If possible, click to play, otherwise your browser may be unable to play this audio file. Don’t forget that I’m listening to content in the class as well! Perhaps this will be your first listen webmention? 😉 For badges from static sites, you could simply use raw HTML on a page like Aaron Parecki outlines.1 The “sending” site doesn’t need to be able to send webmentions although the receiving site needs to be able to receive them. You can then use a service like mention-tech.appspot.com/ or telegraph.p3k.io/send-a-webmention to have your static site send the webmention for you! References 1. Parecki A. Sending your First Webmention from Scratch. Aaron Parecki. aaronparecki.com/2018/06/30/11/your-first-webmention. Published June 30, 2018. Accessed August 6, 2018. Syndicated copies to:
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Read Sending your First Webmention from Scratch by Aaron Parecki (Aaron Parecki) Webmention is one of the fundamental indieweb building blocks. It enables rich interactions between websites, like posting a comment or favorite on one site from another site. This post will walk you through the simplest way to get started sending webmentions to other sites so that you can use your ... A stupendous article, I just wish I’d had it all those many years ago. Thanks Aaron! One useful thing for beginners that I don’t think got mentioned (pun intended!) in the article is that for receiving websites which don’t have a built in webmention form you can use a service like mention-tech.appspot.com/ which will allow you to manually put in the sending site and the receiving site and it will act as a bridge to send the webmention for you. Syndicated copies to:
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With many pages vanishing from the web this week, we've been thinking about archiving in #indiewebOne thing that several people have started to do is to send their posts and the pages they link to to the internet archiveI was already doing this for all SVG's posted to svgshare.com, my vector image sharing site (though I fixed some bugs in that today too).But what could I do for my other posts? Well, I previously made mention-tech to send webmentions, which is handy for my static posts on kevinmarks.com, so I made it ping the archive for both source and target URLs in the webmention sent. Do try it yourself.#100DaysOfIndieWeb
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for #indiewebsummit people trying out webmentions, mention-tech.appspot.com will let you send the manually and pass them through
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for #indiewebsummit people trying out webmentions, mention-tech.appspot.com/ will let you send the manually and pass them through
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#indieweb twitter.com/kevinmarks: I've been expanding mention-tech.appspot.com to accept fragmentions as well, and show them as quotes
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#indieweb twitter.com/kevinmarks: because mention-tech accepts wm's to and from anything indiewebcamp.com/irc/2016-03-09… shows in mention-tech.appspot.com/listmentions?t
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check out the Brighton HWC: jpg
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brid-gy.appspot.com/post/twitter/mention_tech/672616354978119680
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brid-gy.appspot.com/post/twitter/mention_tech/672256865267523585
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socialwg.indiewebcamp.com/irc/social/2015-12-02
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kylewm.com/2015/11/let-s-ping-http-mention-tech-appspot-com
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known.kevinmarks.com/2015/the-code-for--techappspotcom-is-at-kevinmarksmentionte…
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checkmention.appspot.com/content/1514cf05376/cc3112956277999cf0e35df7532b48c00b4…
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checkmention.appspot.com/content/1514cf05376/cc3112956277999cf0e35df7532b48c00b4…
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checkmention.appspot.com/content/1514cf05376/cc3112956277999cf0e35df7532b48c00b4…
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github.com/w3c-social/webmention/issues/1
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brid-gy.appspot.com/post/twitter/mention_tech/670460526195949573
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indiewebcamp.com/irc/2015-11-27
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